Adult Neurology

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neuroinflammatory disease that affects myelin, a substance that makes up the membrane (called the myelin sheath) that wraps around nerve fibers (axons). Myelinated axons are commonly called white matter. The disease is characterized by multiple attacks of multiple symptoms if left untreated.

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Dementia

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in those over the age of 65. As many as 5 million Americans age 65 and older may have AD, and that number is expected to double for every 5-year interval beyond age 65.

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Parkinson Disease

Parkinson disease is a movement disorders. The four main symptoms are tremor, or trembling in hands, arms, legs, jaw, or head; rigidity, or stiffness of the limbs and trunk; bradykinesia, or slowness of movement; and postural instability, or impaired balance. These symptoms usually begin gradually and worsen with time.

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Sleep disorders

Our brain is very active during sleep. Sleep affects our daily functioning and our physical and mental health in many ways that we are just beginning to understand.

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Pain

Proper diagnosis of the source of pain is very important. Pain can come from multiple structures in the body. For that reason, the approach to pain is multidisciplinary.

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Peripheral polyneuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a damage to the peripheral nerves, the vast communications network that transmits information from the brain and spinal cord (the central nervous system) to every other part of the body.

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Stroke

A stroke or "brain attack" (just like a heart attack) occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery or a blood vessel breaks, interrupting blood flow to an area of the brain. When either of these things happen, brain cells begin to die and brain damage occurs.

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Myasthenia gravis

Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease characterized by weakness of the skeletal muscles of the body. The name myasthenia gravis, which is Latin and Greek in origin, literally means "grave muscle weakness."

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Tremor

Tremor is an uncontrolled, rhythmic, muscle movement involving to-and-fro movements of one or more parts of the body. It is the most common of all involuntary movements and can affect the hands, arms, head, face, vocal cords, trunk, and legs.

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Dystonia

Dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause slow repetitive movements or abnormal postures. The movements may be painful. There are several different forms of dystonia that may affect only one muscle, groups of muscles, or muscles throughout the body.

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Epilepsy

This disorder is characterized by repetitive unprovoked seizures or tendency to have unprovoked repetitive seizures. More than 2 million people in the United States — about 1 in 100 — have experienced an unprovoked seizure or been diagnosed with epilepsy.

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Headache

Brain tissue itself lacks pain-sensitive nerves and does not feel pain. Headaches occur when pain-sensitive nerve endings called nociceptors react to headache triggers (such as stress, certain foods or odors, or use of medicines) and send messages through the trigeminal nerve to the thalamus, the brain's "relay station" for pain sensation from all over the body.

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Traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health problem in the United States. Each year, traumatic brain injuries contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability.

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